3 Things You May Have Missed This Week: Haiti Struggles to Rebuild, US Military in Africa, Making Solar Roofs from Trash

Friday, December 1, 2017

1. Haitians struggle to rebuild a year after Hurricane Matthew

It’s been nearly a year since Hurricane Matthew hit southern Haiti. Those who were affected are continuing to rebuild, but many are running up against disease, chronic hunger, and loss of livelihoods. As climate change makes Haiti more vulnerable to stronger storms, it’s crucial that local people have the resources to protect their farms and sustain themselves.

As important as it is to provide immediate support in the aftermath of the hurricane, we are committed to investing in local communities for the long haul. To support our work with local people rebuilding their lives after Hurricane Matthew, go to: https://donate.actionaidusa.org/hurricanematthew.

2. US military presence in Africa has increased instability

From zero to 50. That’s how many terrorist groups have emerged across Africa since the United States made “counterterrorism funding” a priority over the last decade. With money and equipment coming in from the US, the militaries of a number of African countries have become more powerful than their governments.

Earlier this year the Trump administration made a proposal to expand US military presence in Africa – at the expense of diplomacy and humanitarian aid. By flexing its military muscle and turning a blind eye to the interests of individuals on the ground, it seems that the US is only making things worse in African countries.

3. Engineers in India make solar panels from recycled trash

One person’s trash is indeed another person’s treasure. A group of engineers in India is using recycled trash to make solar panels. Through their startup company they want to offer an alternative roofing system to people living in homes with makeshift roofs, which can collapse during storms. Aside from providing health and environmental benefits, the solar roofs are easy to put together and provide better insulation than metal sheets. And they’re expected to cost 10 times less than concrete. If this product takes off, we may be seeing more of these blue, modular solar roofs over the next few decades.